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Site number:
Type of site: Cultural
Date: 3rd century BC
Date of Inscription: 2017
Location: Euro-Asia, Turkey, Anatolia
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Description: Located in southwestern Turkey, in the upper valley of the Morsynus River, the site consists of two components: the archaeological site of Aphrodisias and the marble quarries northeast of the city. The temple of Aphrodite dates from the 3rd century BCE and the city was built one century later. The wealth of Aphrodisias came from the marble quarries and the art produced by its sculptors. The city streets are arranged around several large civic structures, which include temples, a theatre, an agora, and two bath complexes. --WHMNet's description is from WHC Site, where additional information is available. CC BY-SA 3.0.
  Aphrodisias (/æfrəˈdɪsiəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀφροδισιάς Aphrodisiás) was a small ancient Greek city in the historic Caria cultural region of western Anatolia, Turkey. It is located near the modern village of Geyre, about 100 km (62 mi) east/inland from the coast of the Aegean Sea, and 230 km (140 mi) southeast of İzmir. Aphrodisias was named after Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love, who had here her unique cult image, the Aphrodite of Aphrodisias. According to the Suda, a Byzantine encyclopedic compilation, before the city became known as Aphrodisias (c.3rd century BCE) it had three previous names: Lelégōn Pólis (Λελέγων πόλις, "City of the Leleges"), Megálē Pólis (Μεγάλη Πόλις, "Great City"), and Ninóē (Νινόη). Sometime before 640, in the Late Antiquity period when it was within the Byzantine Empire, the city was renamed Stauroúpolis (Σταυρούπολις, "City of the Cross"). --Wikipedia. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. CC BY-SA 3.0.
Source: Description is available under license. CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0
Source2: Wikipedia ( CC BY-SA 3.0.
Reference: 1. UNESCO World Heritage Center ( 2. Wikipedia. CC-BY-SA IGO 3.0
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